| by NILANTHA ILANGAMUWA

( March 28, 2014, New Delhi, Sri Lanka Guardian) It was nothing surprising! We plucked the alyssicarpus in order to what we had cultivated. The failure of the country in the national and international arena is the systematic plot which is strategically designed by the old feudalistic clan which maintains dominancy over the power. The “Rajapaksa democracy” is the vaginalis of the social disorder which is now the normal practice in the country, that is decorated by the “popular Buddhism” and “historical myth” injected to the general attitude as the cultural rights.

Human Rights Council - 25th Session
Voting of resolution L.1/Rev.1 " Promoting reconciliation, accountability and Human Rights in Sri Lanka " during the 25th Session of the Human Rights Council. 27 March 2014. UN Photo / Jean-Marc Ferré
This is the most embarrassing moment that any free thinking person could face while standing before the country. Those who have no shame and continually engaged in the annihilation of ethics and freedom, dignity and humanity can further gamble in the country by using naked power. This moment can be equated to a man who is standing naked in front of a woman before making love. The Rajapaksa clan tends to do whatever they desire and because of this the country is in a dilemma. The time has come to have real statesmen! Unfortunately the seeds of leadership have been eliminated for one feudalistic reason after another.

The third resolution on Sri Lanka has been adopted and there is much ado by many parties. The malnutrition of the intellectual capacity or the diplomatic skill we have seen during the last few days was brought to the edge yesterday, both before and after the adoption of the resolution. Many politicians who are with the government emotionally played the game while showing their stupidity as the country’s representatives.
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"It was one of my friends who visited Sri Lanka recently and spent three weeks, meeting various people from grassroots activists to so called “intellectuals” who brought up a very good question after his short visit. One intellectual proudly told him about his dinner with the president. I can do no better than borrow the words from best anarchists, where they described this kind of inferiority complex as being none other than but “intellectual masturbation”. This kind of complicity may guide you to have political appointments inside or outside the country but it will never be a positive contribution to the social change."
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However, neither the government nor those who contribute to the government in the opinion level has shown their capacity to solve this problem. All they have done is contribute to the further isolation and feign anger for the serious problems the country needs to face. As this writer mentioned earlier, the whole problem is about the country itself. The scenario is about the killings of people and burying the general freedom in broad day light.

Many countries have overcome and survived tragedies, from slavery to genocide. But Sri Lanka is tragically moving backwards to the level where many countries were in late the 60s to early 70s. It was one of my friends who visited Sri Lanka recently and spent three weeks, meeting various people from grassroots activists to so called “intellectuals” who brought up a very good question after his short visit. One intellectual proudly told him about his dinner with the president. I can do no better than borrow the words from best anarchists like Mikhail Bakunin, Alexander Berkman, Albert Camus, Emma Goldman and etc., where they described this kind of inferiority complex as being none other than but “intellectual masturbation”. This kind of complicity may guide you to have political appointments inside or outside the country but it will never be a positive contribution to the social change.

“I have seen many countries, and I have seen people who led the armed struggles against the state for real change. But particularly in Sri Lanka, what I thought strange was how yesterday’s rebel take a ministerial post in the today’s government”. In this one question he unveiled the complicity of the social dynamic in the country. Here is the real problem that we have to deal with.

Adopting the third resolution is big achievement indeed, but it has not touched the very area which requires investigation. However, this resolution is a different approach from what the international community took in last few decades while issuing statements, one after another and gave ad hoc based advice to an already rotten system. The outcome of that kind of kindergarten lessons, shows on the street when the country’s first lady chief Justice was kicked out from the post and unarmed civilians who peacefully protests for drinking water were killed.

The time has come. The resolution is the concluding operation of catching a fly in a dark room. Only now do they turn on the light to see what they are trying to catch and find that the subject of their search is a long way off.

Thus, the sleepwalking the international community has finally awakened on the issue of Sri Lanka.

Nilantha Ilangamuwa edits the Sri Lanka Guardian and he also an editor of the Torture: Asian and Global Perspectives, bi-monthly print magazine. He is the author of the just released non-fictions, “Nagna Balaya” (The Naked Power), in Sinhalese and “The Conflation”, in English. He can be reached at ilangamuwa@gmail.com

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